Charleston

Sometimes called “The Holy City” by its residents due to the prevalence of churches in the city limits, Charleston more than any other city still holds the cultural memory of the Antebellum South close to its heart. Only Savannah, GA, rivals its nearly pristine Southern-ness. Strangely enough, Charleston is also home to the second-oldest synagogue in America. As with most cities, Charleston is a thing of extremes – not only do you have the beauty, history, and air of the Old South, you also get the brutal, jarring modernity of the supercenters, malls, tourist traps, and other such progress. Then, of course, there’s the little kernel of shame that the city built upon – slavery and the slave trade. Whenever you encounter some restored bit of Charleston’s history, whether it be the museums, the homes at the Battery, or a revived bed & breakfast, you can’t help but recall that this was built by people that found the ownership of other human beings perfectly acceptable. This is especially poignant due to the Gullah culture of the nearby Sea Islands, which is built off the folk beliefs of former slaves, around the Roots…similar but not quite the same as Voodoo.

Charleston

Southland Gods inarvan inarvan